Living With Mesothelioma My Diary- Stephen had Bowel Cancer but lived life to the full so courageous a journey Goodnight you wonderful young man


Iv had a really lovely day today the sun has really got very warm  and it was lovely in the garden. All the garden has come on and everything looks well.

I did do the housework while Ray went out with Louis, but changing the beds as well makes me realise how weak I am. Im going to have to build my muscles up , they say use it or loose it, well I have lost it.

I have my Revitive on so lets build the muscles.

We had a nice chicken salad for lunch and instead of falling asleep we went to the park and did a longer walk.  So lovely on a sunny warm sunny day. The birds were singing the sheep were bleating, Louis was chasing his ball. Well actually he was a naughty boy he rolled in a patch  of very wet sheep poo.

I Tried to  wash it off but couldn’t, we had to take a very dirty you man smelling the car out. Oh the smell of the country side in the car was appalling. Ray wound the windows down. I couldn’t wait to put him in the shower. He smells divine now

Came back and had a tidy up of the garden so easy now the builder has been .

Found this on Facebook today and I love the thought of this.

I wonder if this could work Being in tune with your natural Body Clock is about a lot more than knowing whether your are a “lark” or an “owl”.

As the BBC’s Day of the Body Clock has shown, it can also have a profound effect on our health.

Doctors are becoming increasingly interested in the science of chronotherapy – aligning medical treatment to our circadian rhythms.

Cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are two disease areas where chronotherapy is showing promise.

Chemotherapy
Every three weeks Philippe Maillol makes the 500 mile round trip from his home in Limoges to Paris for cancer treatment.

cancer patient
Philippe Maillol is being treated for pancreatic cancer
He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in August 2013 and began standard chemotherapy in Limoges with the drugs infused during the day.

But the side effects were hard to bear.

“I was completely exhausted,” said Philippe. “When I got home from my local hospital I couldn’t even speak, let alone eat. I suffered extreme nausea which lasted for days.”

Six months ago Philippe switched to treatment at the Paul Brousse hospital in Villejuif in southern Paris.

Now his drug infusions are spaced during the day, with two happening overnight while he sleeps.

“The impact on my body is much gentler” he said. “So much so that I don’t need to take the anti-nausea drugs which themselves carried their own side-effects.”

He treatment is being led by Professor Francis Levi, one of the pioneers of chronotherapy.

He said: “We have clocks within our cells that govern the metabolism of drugs. So some drugs are best given at night and others during the day.

“We have found chronotherapy is reducing the toxicity of treatments and improving the quality of life of patients, by respecting the circadian rhythms of the patients.

Prof Levi is taking up a post at Warwick Medical School later this year.

He plans to continue his research into cancer chronotherapy and will treat patients at University Hospital Birmingham.

Rheumatoid arthritis
The University of Manchester is conducting a small chronotherapy trial for rheumatoid arthritis.

The inflammatory condition causes pain and swelling in the joints.

Ten patients are having their sleep/wake cycle and movements monitored for a week, culminating with a 24-hour stay at Manchester Royal Infirmary.

During this visit, their blood and saliva are analysed to examine immune cells.

patient
Krystal Fayle has rheumatoid arthritis
Krystal Fayle, 27, is one of those on the trial.

She said: “I wake up in pain every day and it often hurts to walk.

“I don’t really go out much anymore because I can’t stand for long because my joints are swollen.”

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis commonly find their symptoms are worse in the morning. But now doctors realise this is not simply because joints stiffen up through lack of use overnight.

“Rheumatoid arthritis is driven by cells in the immune system called T lymphocytes” said David Ray, Prof of Medicine at University of Manchester.

“These cells each have their own clock, and their inflammatory response varies depending on the time of day.

“Even when we remove them from the body and look at them in a dish they still keep a day/night rhythm.”

Some of the drug treatments for rheumatoid arthritis are relatively toxic and carry a significant risk of side effects.

The trial is trying to determine the best time to deliver drugs so that they dampen the immune system only when needed.

Prof Ray said: “The processes that drive the disease are only active for part of 24 cycle – so if get our potent drug in at the right time we can avoid exposing patients to toxic drugs throughout the day.”

Krystal Fayle suffered liver damage from one drug and hair loss from another. So she is hoping that the trial may identify a better treatment.

She said: “To have a drug that worked for me would be absolutely brilliant, and make life much easier.”

The trial is still recruiting but should be completed later this year.

Timing medical treatment to fit our natural biological rhythms is still unusual.

Further patient trials of chronotherapy are needed for what remains an area at the fringe of medicine.

But it is a concept that is gaining ground as more doctors realise the importance of our body clock.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-27398730

I have to say that this was the best act Saturday as the young lad has turned being bullied around. Good luck to him as this will be a hit even if he doesn’t win The taller lad has a lovely voice  as well.

Photo: It's a final thumbs up from me! I've done well to blag things as well as I have up till now, but unfortunately I think this is just one hurdle too far.</p>
<p>It's a shame the end has come so suddenly- there's so many people I haven't got round to properly thank or say goodbye too. Apologies for that.</p>
<p>There was also so many exciting projects and things I didn't get to see out. Hopefully some will continue and if you want to carry on the fundraising please do (justgiving.com/stephen-sutton-TCT<br />
is the link to donate to).</p>
<p>All future updates on this page will probably be from a family member. I hopefully may have the energy to write a few tweets (@_StephensStory). I will continue fighting for as long as I can, and whatever happens next I want you all to know I am currently in a good place mentally and at ease with the situation.</p>
<p>That's it from me. But life has been good. Very good. </p>
<p>Thank you to my mum and the rest of my family for everything. Thank you to my friends for being amazing. Thank you to my medical team for the hard work and effort they've continually they've put towards me. And thank you everyone else for sharing this wonderful journey with me.</p>
<p>I love you all :) x

I also have to pay homage to   he died today but he left his last message just before he did -what a lovely young man and now he is raising money still it will go up to many millions by the weekend

What a really brave young man Stephen had  Bowel Cancer but lived life to the full so courageous a journey 
It’s a final thumbs up from me! I’ve done well to blag things as well as I have up till now, but unfortunately I think this is just one hurdle too far.It’s a shame the end has come so suddenly- there’s so many people I haven’t got round to properly thank or say goodbye too. Apologies for that.

There was also so many exciting projects and things I didn’t get to see out. Hopefully some will continue and if you want to carry on the fundraising please do (justgiving.com/stephen-sutton-TCT
is the link to donate to).

All future updates on this page will probably be from a family member. I hopefully may have the energy to write a few tweets (@_StephensStory). I will continue fighting for as long as I can, and whatever happens next I want you all to know I am currently in a good place mentally and at ease with the situation.

That’s it from me. But life has been good. Very good.

Thank you to my mum and the rest of my family for everything. Thank you to my friends for being amazing. Thank you to my medical team for the hard work and effort they’ve continually they’ve put towards me. And thank you everyone else for sharing this wonderful journey with me.

I love you all  x

 — with Jane Bolger and 14 others.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s