Living With Mesothelioma-My Diary- A power cut stops my world, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Zimbawe blocking the adding of chrysotile to a worldwide dangerous substances list, Please send your support to the The Asbestos Victims Charter for Justice


Working away this morning answering emails and messages very happily;y when the power went off.

Oh dear! err how do I make a cup of tea, no kettle as that’s electric. Oh yes a saucepan filled with water and on the gas cures that. Oh no sparker, no matches, yes a electric gas lighter in the draw. One spark and it went dead but at least the gas was alight and the water warming nicely.

Its so quiet, the radio is down in the Motor Home.

Ray walked the dog and asked the Park Manager what had happened but he didnt know so ray came home and phoned the electric company. It was 10am now and the power went off at 8am.

They had only just found out about it and were trying to find out just where the problem was. Ray was asked if he would like text updates. So every now and again through the day (yes the whole day) we knew just what was going on.

We went shopping and walking Louis before 12 as what else could we do. Lucky that I had done the washing early but as it was pouring with rain and I could use the dryer I was stuck with it wet.

At 3pm we at last had power, the lights came on, the front bell rang, the clocks all beeped on and the computers all turned on. The world went made but we were back in the world again.

Tomorrow is my big day- Scan day when I’m either going to shock the world with more shrinkage or disappoint the world with growth.  So much depends on my body and my mesothelioma reaction to the MK3475 Trial and tomorrow is no 25 —I will take what comes and deal with it like I have done for 6 years now.

Last week I spent every effort to back the Rotterdam Convention list, according to groups attending the Geneva meeting that wrapped up Saturday.. It ended up with Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Zimbawe blocking the adding of chrysotile to a worldwide dangerous substances list https://t.co/tDCGEgzsxw So the death of so many people will be on their hands.

About 125 million people are exposed to asbestos at work, according to the WHO, mainly in mines, factories and on construction sites

The 1998 Rotterdam Convention restricts trade in chemicals by obliging exporters to ensure that destination countries have been fully informed about the risks involved and have given an explicit green light for imports.

Civil society groups and unions calling for chrysotile’s inclusion on the list voiced outrage that the fifth attempt in a decade to do so had been blocked.

“The failure to list chrysotile asbestos means millions of exposed workers will stay ignorant of its deadly dangers,” said Brian Kohler, head of health, security and sustainable development for the IndustriALL Global Union.

“Countries that support the listing must be more aggressive in preventing the Rotterdam Convention from remaining a farce,” he told AFP in an email.

The Rotterdam Convention requires full consensus by all signatory members, meaning a single country can block a bid to list a new substance.

The Geneva meeting did manage to add the insecticide methamidophos to the list, according to conference organisers, but failed to list a range of other chemicals, including the pesticide paraquat, which studies have linked to Parkinson’s disease.

The question of whether or not to list chrysotile asbestos and the other chemicals where consensus was not reached will likely be raised again at the next conference on the Rotterdam Convention in 2017.

Alexandra Caterbow, the co-coordinator of the Rotterdam Convention Alliance organisation, warned the meeting that delaying the listing of chrysotile would have dire consequences.

– ‘Death sentence’ –

“Every year you do not list, thousands and thousands of people will be exposed to this substance, which means their death sentence,” she told the conference.

According to the World Health Organization, at least 107,000 people die each year from asbestos-related cancers and lung diseases such as asbestosis and mesothelioma.

While other types of asbestos have long been acknowledged to be hazardous to health, chrysotile is still widely used, especially as an inexpensive ingredient in building materials used in developing countries.

Around two million tonnes of chrysotile asbestos is produced each year, with the industry and a number of nations that produce or use the substance maintaining it is safe.

But WHO says “cancer risks have been observed in populations exposed to very low levels” of asbestos, including chrysotile.

About 125 million people are exposed to asbestos at work, according to WHO, mainly in mines, factories and on construction sites.

Workers’ families can also be exposed through the dust on clothes, and building materials in homes can continue to be a source of exposure for decades.

Sharad Sawant, a 75-year-old former asbestos worker at a Turner and Newall asbestos factory in Mumbai, came to Geneva to lobby for listing chrysotile, after he and his wife both were diagnosed with asbestosis.

“My children know I’m suffering and that their mother is suffering,” he told reporters through a translator, voicing concern his adult children and even grandchildren may have been exposed.

“This is the fault of the asbestos company,” he said.

India has long vehemently opposed adding chrysotile to the Rotterdam Convention list, but did not in the end join the four countries officially opposing its inclusion.

The number of countries opposing listing chrysotile has been shrinking in recent years.

Past efforts to do so were long stymied by Canada, a major producer, but the government withdrew support for the industry in 2012.

And this year, activists were pleased to see that Brazil, another chrysotile producer, backed listing the substance.

3rd

Please send your support to the The Asbestos Victims Charter for Justice

In the UK in 2015 more people will die of asbestos related diseases than will be killed on
the roads. Every year the number of people affected continues to rise.
Asbestos remains the single biggest cause of work related deaths. The people affected are
suffering through no fault of their own and we believe this country owes a debt of justice to
asbestos victims and their families.
That is why we are proud to support the Charter for Justice. We believe these changes will
make a real difference and we hope you can support them too.

The Asbestos Victims
Charter for Justice
We believe in Welfare Justice
 Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit (IIDB) should be
retained and improved. It should also be disregarded for
the purposes of calculating a person’s entitlement to
means tested benefits such as Pension Credits and Local
Housing Allowance.
 Posthumous payments made under the Pneumoconiosis,
etc. (Workers Compensation) Act 1979 and the 2008
Diffuse Mesothelioma Scheme should be made at the
same rate as in life payments.
 Constant Attendance Allowance should be automatically
awarded at the intermediate rate where IIDB has
been awarded for mesothelioma or lung cancer.
We believe in fair a compensation system
 Payments from the Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment
Scheme should help all asbestos victims. All people who
have had payments should receive 100% of average
awards, all prescribed asbestos related diseases should
be covered by the scheme and the scheme should be put
on a sound financial footing. The levy on the Insurance
Industry should be written into law at a minimum level of
3%.
 People who are suffering from lung cancer which has
only developed because of exposure to asbestos should
be treated in the same way as mesothelioma sufferers
when making a civil claim. We believe in amending the
2006 Compensation Act.
 Compensation claims which are settled when the sufferer
is alive should be treated in the same way as those
settled after death. Currently they are treated differently
and this means that sufferers are often forced to choose
between settling for less during their lifetime or dying with
the uncertainty of an outstanding claim.
We believe in the right to decent medical treatment
 It is time to review the 2007 Mesothelioma Framework.
The Framework has led to improvements but access
to the best treatment can still be a post code lottery. That
is why the uptake from a revised framework must be made
mandatory.
 Every area of the UK should have a specialist mesothelioma
nurse to ensure the spread of best practice.
We believe in properly resourced medical research
 The UK is becoming a world leader in medical research
into asbestos related diseases. We believe in ensuring this
continues by putting in place a sustainable, ongoing
source of funding.
 Part of that funding should be provided by the monies
raised by the use of recovery of benefits legislation on
Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment Scheme payments.
We believe in preventing future tragedies
 We need a national public information campaign on
the dangers of asbestos in the workplace, home and
public environments. We need a tough regulatory
framework that ensures people who break the control of
asbestos regulations get prosecuted.
 We need to address the issue of asbestos in schools.
We need a national audit of all schools to identify the
presence and condition of asbestos and a long term policy
to eradicate asbestos from our schools.
I support the Charter for Justice:
Name: ………………………………………………………….. Position (if applicable): …………………………………
Address: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
……………………………………………………….. Post Code: ……………………………………………………
Email: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Please return to the Asbestos Victims Support Groups Forum UK, 138 Digbeth, Birmingham, B5 6DR
or email asbestosforum@wmht.co.uk

lord

Rays Blog https://mesoandme.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/monday-125/

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